The Turn of the Screw by Benjamin Britten
Kings Head Theatre, Opera Up Close

Directed by Edward Dick
Conducted by David Eaton
Lighting design by Richard Howell
NEXT PROJECT
La_Serva_Padrona.html
contactcontact.html
current projectscurrent_projects.html
biographybiography.html
worksworks.html
What’s on Stage  ★★★★
“...Housing the opera in a tight white skin with slots for doors is a stroke of genius...there’s something quite disturbing in this clinical dissection of disintegration, with Richard Bleasdale’s fleeting monochrome projections and Richard Howell’s murky lighting adding eerieness.... Edward Dick’s production of The Turn of the Screw for OperaUpClose is everything that small-scale opera should be: a tightly-controlled and brilliantly thought-through concept that allows us to see and hear a great work in a totally new light.”

The Guardian 
"....Signe Beckmann's stark and atmospheric design"

The Good Review
"...a stunning use of gauze, and silhouettes and videoscapes which make this small production retain the grandeur of any operatic stage."

A Younger Theatre
"Signe Beckmann’s stark, elegant set design makes ingenious use of semi-sheer fabric and clean lines to transport the nineteenth-century setting of Henry James’ famous novella. Clever lighting and Richard Bleasdale’s mysterious video projections turn the walls of the set into a shaping-screen of fractured psyches and the afterlife, where children tauntingly play hide and seek, and menacing spirits glower and lurk.... this is a truly impressive and enjoyable staging which succeeds in being both thought-provoking and emotive, ambiguous and quietly chilling."


Westend Broadwayworld
"Retaining the tight intimacy that marks their work at London's Little Opera House, Signe Beckmann's elegantly plain white space is transformed by Richard Bleasdale's video projections into fields, marshes and lakes, without ever losing the eerieness of a haunted house and, under Edward Dick's claustrophobic direction, the confinement of a prison cell... quite unlike anything else you will find in London or beyond."

On the Fringe
"The minimal staging was utilised to great effect – the normally black box room turned ghostly white, mimicking a claustrophobic psychiatric ward.  It was simple, yet coldly effective."